GLOBAL WARMING INFO | inpact from COVID-19|

How Coronavirus Could Set Back the Fight Against Climate Change.

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The coronavirus has a big impact for our humanity! But what about the Coronavirus and Carbon Emissions?
One thing that may benefit from the social isolation: the environment.

This year was supposed to be a big one in the international fight against climate change. But the fast spreading new coronavirus disease, COVID-19, is posing a triple-threat to action that could derail the Paris Agreement effort to combat global warming, worried experts say.

In the past month, the world has seen a remarkably large drop in emissions of carbon dioxide, the main driver of global warming. The reason isn’t something to celebrate, though.

Nitrogen Dioxide in Europe from January to March.
China

The coronavirus outbreak in China, which has sickened at least 80,000 people, has shut down factories, refineries and flights across the country as officials order people to stay home. As a result, China’s carbon dioxide emissions over the past three weeks have been about 25 percent lower than during the same period last year, according to calculations by Lauri Myllyvirta, an analyst at the Center for Research on Energy and Clean Air.

The coronavirus outbreak has seen widespread changes in human behaviour, encouraging companies to alter everyday operations by suggesting employees work from home, which is reducing congestion and enhancing air quality. NASA’s Earth Observatory  recently released satellite images of China highlight the dramatic reduction in pollution, in particular in nitrogen dioxide (NO2), that occurred this year. Nitrogen dioxide is emitted by motor vehicles, industrial facilities and power plants. This reduction was initially identified around Wuhan, but rapidly spread across China as millions of people have been quarantined and forced to make dramatic alterations to their everyday routines.

venice

The COVID-19 outbreak hit countries like Italy really hard, forcing country officials to intervene and ask citizens to go into lockdown. As a result, people stayed indoors, business shuttered their windows, cars stayed parked and families hunkered down to protect themselves from getting sick.

But for residents of the world-famous city — built around a network of canals — there has been a slither of a silver lining: the water in Venice’s famously congested waterways is the cleanest it has been for years.

Once upon a time, residents of Venice would swim in the lagoon waters, but the onset of mass tourism and the corresponding increase in boat traffic in recent decades has made it rare.

A report from the European Parliament in February 2019 described the levels of both air and water pollution in Venice “worrying”, blaming unregulated boats and cruises with diesel marine engines.

is COVID 19 a positive thing…

“The coronavirus outbreak has seen widespread changes in human behaviour, encouraging companies to alter everyday operations by suggesting employees work from home, which is reducing congestion and enhancing air quality.” Nevertheless, the COVID-19 effect on economic activity, population decline, emotional well-being and a lot more that will effect us personally, now our later on.

Information based on: time, birmingham,the new york times,…



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